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2010 Segregation – A Continuing Urban Saga



[Source: John Paul DeWitt of CensusScope.org and the University of Michigan’s Social Science Data Analysis Network]


In a recent, well-researched and accessible Salon “slide show” authored by DANIEL DENVIR, a journalist based in Philadelphia, a series of identical-scale US Census choropleths are dishearteningly similar. Denvir does a nice job of contextualizing the patterns for each of the “Top Ten” segregated urban cores.



[Source: John Paul DeWitt of CensusScope.org and the University of Michigan’s Social Science Data Analysis Network]


According to Denvir’s article, the rankings and resulting maps are based on a dissimilarity index, a common measure of residential segregation. It reflects the number of people from one race — in this case black or white — who would have to move for races to be evenly distributed across a certain area. A score of 1 indicates perfect integration while 100 signals complete segregation. The map series classification is as follows:




[Source: John Paul DeWitt of CensusScope.org and the University of Michigan’s Social Science Data Analysis Network]

From the article, the following is the “Top Ten” segregated metropolitan areas (+500,000 Population):

No. 1: Milwaukee- 81.52
No. 2: New York- 78.04
No. 3: Chicago- 76.43
No. 4: Detroit- 75.25
No. 5: Cleveland- 74.14
No. 6: Buffalo- 73.24
No. 7: St. Louis- 72.3
No. 8: Cincinnati- 69.42
No. 9: Philadelphia- 68.41
No. 10: Los Angeles- 67.84

 

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